Goya: The Witches and Old Women Album - Museum Bookstore

Goya: The Witches and Old Women Album

Regular price £29.95

'This exhibition, it seems, is the key to the Goya Code, the door to this private artist’s inner world. It reveals exactly why his horrific scenes are so convincing, immediate, and yet inscrutable.' - The Guardian 

Goya’s Wicked Woman, c1819- 23 - Goya: The Witches and Old Women Album

Ravaged by a debilitating illness and all-but completely deaf, Francisco de Goya (1746-1828) was a changed artist in middle age. While he continued as a court painter to the Spanish crown, he worked privately on eight albums of some 600 brush and ink drawings. The drawings they contained – populated with nightmarish figures, superstitious tales and horrific deaths – were never intended to be seen beyond a small circle of friends.

Published to accompany the Courtauld's 2015 exhibition, this publication brings together, for the first time, all the existing pages from one of those eight albums - the Witches and Old Women album. This album was a long-scattered sketchbook filled with drawings of witchcraft, old age and other obsessions in about 1819-23. The drawings are less about old women than about Goya, as he faces illness and death, and the monsters in his dreams.

  • Author: Juliet Wilson-Bareau, Art historian and Curator, Goya: The Witches and Old Women Album
  • Paperback: 200 pages
  • Date published: February 2015
  • Language: English
  • ISBN: 978-1907372766
  • Product Dimensions: 26 x 21.6 x 1.9 cm

★★★★★ 'This exhibition, it seems, is the key to the Goya Code, the door to this private artist’s inner world. It reveals exactly why his horrific scenes are so convincing, immediate, and yet inscrutable'  - The Guardian 

★★★★ 'A first exhibition of Goya's wickedly brilliant drawings brings us closer to the Old Master than ever' - The Daily Telegraph

'One of the highlights of the cultural year' - The Independent
'Superb' - The Times

'Reuniting an album of drawings for the first time since Goya’s death, the show was an exemplary piece of scholarship. His observations of human character, his sympathetic, gentle eye and remarkable draughtsmanship are simply unforgettable' - The Arts Desk